Your Body, On Water

June 04, 2019

Your Body, On Water

Athletic or not, we all need water. And plenty of it. Hydration affects how our body works in daily activities, how prone it is to injury, and how well it recovers from injury.
 
Water facilitates hundreds of critical functions in the body, many of which are essential for maintaining good muscle tone, joint mobility, and even managing pain. Specific to the musculoskeletal system, water helps:
 
1) transport nutrients and oxygen in the bloodstream (which muscles need to properly contract and recover).
2) flush out waste and toxins (which plays a role in reducing muscle soreness).
lubricate and reduce friction in the joints.
3) facilitate muscle contraction.
 
Dehydrated muscles and joints are prone to:
 
Cramps: resulting from imbalances in the electrolytes needed for muscle contraction.

Cartilage wear and tear: joints aren't receiving nutrients needed for maintenance and repair after injury.
 
Friction in the joints: dehydration can deprive your cartilage of the water it needs to maintain cushion, which can lead to achy or "creaking" joints and osteoarthritis (OA).
 
Pain: dehydrated muscle tissue can't flush out waste products or toxins that build up from exertion, injury or other stress.
 
Are You Dehydrated?
Dehydration means your body lacks the water required to function. You can become dehydrated if you don't replace fluids lost through exercise, from exposure to the elements, or from vomiting/diarrhea. Excessive caffeine consumption leads to dehydration.

Your daily water requirement depends on age, gender, activity level, body composition, health status, and climate. The color of your urine isn't an accurate guide since certain foods, supplements, and medications change urine color. To ensure sufficient water intake, drink one-half (1/2) of your body weight in ounces. Example: If you weigh 130 pounds, drink 65 ounces of water each day.

Dehydration can quickly become a life-threatening emergency. Signs include:
 
Mild Dehydration: dry mouth, irritability, headaches and muscle cramps.

Moderate Dehydration: dizziness, clumsy, exhausted, racing heartbeat. You may be unable to urinate, stand, or focus your eyes.

Severe Dehydration: the function of vital organs is impaired. Without water, you will enter a coma and die.
 
Put Down those Sugary Sports Drinks. Here are Sweeter Ways to Get Hydrated
 
Go Coconut.  Coconut water is rich in natural electrolytes. While not scientifically proven, theoretically it can boost hydration and you may enjoy the flavor more than plain water.

Infuse It!  Add fresh or frozen slices of orange, lemon, or lime to your water. Try frozen berries or melon; also try cucumber, mint, ginger or parsley.

Get Fizzy. Bubbly (carbonated) spring water hits the spot on a hot day. Choose varieties without added sweetener.

Have an Herbal. Iced or hot, caffeine-free and herbal teas count toward your water intake and support healthy hydration.

Fruit & Veg Up! Many fruits and veggies have a high water and nutrient content: cantaloupe, honeydew, strawberries, watermelon, pineapple, peaches, cucumber, lettuce and celery.
 
For more ideas on hydrating to support a healthy body, talk with your holistic health practitioner.
 
 
Resources

National Hydration Council (UK) "Hydration." https://www.naturalhydrationcouncil.org.uk/hydration-facts/
 
Havens, K. "Hydration and why it matters for preventing injuries." Posted May 2016: https://www.coastalorthoteam.com/blog/hydration-why-water-matters-for-preventing-injuries
 
Popkin, Barry M., Kristen E. D'Anci, and Irwin H. Rosenberg. "Water, Hydration and Health." Nutrition reviews 68.8 (2010): 439–458. PMC. Web. 8 Mar 2017:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908954/
 
Jequier E, Constant F. "Water as an essential nutrient: the physiological basis of hydration." Eur J Clin Nutr.(2010) 64:115–123. 8 Mar 2017:  http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n2/full/ejcn2009111a.html
 
Murray, B. "Hydration and Physical Performance." J Amer Coll of Nutrition (2007 Oct 26) [5 Suppl] 542S-548S. Accessed 8 Mar 2017:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17921463

USGS.gov "The Water in You." Accessed 8 Mar 2017: https://water.usgs.gov/edu/propertyyou.html
 
Heinz V.,"Drink at least eight glasses of water a day." Really? Is there scientific evidence for "8 × 8"?" Amer J Physio- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology(1 November 2002).283:5, R993-R1004 DOI:10.1152/ajpregu.00365.2002 Accessed 8 Mar 2017: http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/283/5/R993.full.pdf+html
 
Long, M. "Sports Performance and Nutrition: A comprehensive guide." Naturopathic Currents. (2015 April - Web). Accessed 8 Mar 2017: http://www.naturopathiccurrents.com/articles/sports-performance-and-nutrition-comprehensive-guide
 
"Water and Nutrition Basics." Accessed 8 Mar 2017: https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/nutrition/index.html
 
Mayo Clinic. "Factors that influence water needs." Accessed 8 Mar 2017: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256?pg=2
 
UNM.edu. "Water: Nature's Most Important Nutrient."  Accessed 13 May 2019: https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/WaterUNM.html




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